Megan McCubbin shares her life lessons.

Feb 27, 2024 | News

The zoologist and wildlife presenter shares her passion for nature, her optimism towards the younger generation, and the joy poodles bring.

Megan McCubbin began her career in wildlife conservation after completing a BSc degree in Zoology from The University of Liverpool. She is 29 years old. She has also participated in scientific studies and investigations around the world. She presents wildlife shows like Springwatch as well as helping to investigate illegal wildlife poaching. McCubbin will co-author the book Back to Nature: how to love life – and save it, with her stepfather, Chris Packham.


My morning routine is…

I like to get outside as soon I can. I am very fortunate to live in a place with lots of greenery and wildlife. I fill my bird feeders and check if any animals are visiting. Fresh air is high on my list of priorities.


I feel optimistic …

I am optimistic about the younger generation because they seem to be more empowered and passionate. I am optimistic about projects such as the National Trust’s Time + Space Award, in which I am involved. It’s a chance for some young people who want to explore their own world-changing ideas in areas such as science, culture and arts, society, or climate and nature to get support.

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What makes you angry?

Inaction. We know that climate change requires action, but we are dragging our feet and not taking quick enough decisions.


I would have loved to be a zoologist or a broadcaster if I hadn’t been…

I’ve always wanted to be a dramatist, but I also love the African bush. I am dyslexic, but I could remember scripts. I didn’t know how because I couldn’t recall my timetable.


The habit I have found most useful in my life is…

I am very good at appreciating nature and the little things. I let my senses soak in everything, from the rustling of the bushes to the chirps of the trees. It’s an excellent habit because it helps me to feel grounded and connected not only to where I am, but also to who I am and where I came from.


The habit that I’ve successfully…

I no longer bite my nails. I’ve also changed my shopping habits to become a more conscious consumer. I’m trying my best to change the world by being aware of how much power my pounds have.

Megan McCubbin, pictured at the far right, with fellow judges David Olusoga, Dame Dr Maggie Aderin Pocock and Tayshan Haden-Smith, as they launch National Trust’s Time + Space Award


When things get tough, I…

I feel instantly at peace when I am in the garden. Sometimes you need to remind yourself what you are fighting for. What I’m fighting is literally in my garden, local park, and local green space. It’s not wild enough, and we have a long way to travel. When things get tough, you can reconnect with nature and remind yourself of why you do what you do.


The biggest thing that I’ve changed in my life is…

The biggest thing that I’ve learned in my life is that we shouldn’t ever change our minds. In the modern world we are constantly learning new things and we need to be flexible in our behaviour and ourselves to incorporate this new information.


My parents taught…

I have three parents, and I’ve learned different things from each of them. They taught me to be grounded. They have taught me to be curious. They’ve taught to stand up for me, which is something I need to do, as I’ve not always done it. They have helped me to gain the confidence to believe that I can achieve what I set out to.

I love to be outside and appreciate the little things. I take in everything


I’ve got a theory about…

We would be in a better place if we paid more attention, not only listened to them but also acted on the solutions they proposed.


My sources for joy are…

My poodles Sid & Nancy. They are highly intelligent and they outwit me a lot of the time. Super-intelligent beings always bring your spirits up.


I would like to tell my younger selves…

Take more time to discover who I am and what I want to do. I would try to let myself be free to make decisions. Dyslexics learn differently and don’t fit into a traditional school system. I would allow myself to explore who I am a little differently than I used to.

Megan McCubbin will be a judge at the National Trust Time + Space Award. The deadline for entries is 30 April. Participants aged 16-25 who have ideas that can change the world are encouraged to apply.


Images: National Trust/Fabio De Paola

 

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